Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Surveys of homeowners in three different ecosystems with varying fuels management approaches reveal that homeowners' trust in natural resource agencies is significantly associated with perceived risks and benefits and with perceived agency...

Person: Winter, Vogt, McCaffrey
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

I recently completed a study providing insight into critical decisions by command officers on some of California's most notorious wildfires in the wildland/urban interface (WUI). My study focused on the first several hours of response to the fires...

Person: Rohde
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

A report highlighting the progress and accomplishments of Forest Service Research and Development under the National Fire Plan in fiscal year 2003. It describes research findings, tool developments, technology transfer, and research highlights in four...

Person:
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

For most overnight campers, camping and campfires seem to go together. Campfires are not only psychologically reassuring, they seem to offer an easy way to get rid of trash. But after cooking dinner, it is wise to burn the garbage in your campfire? How...

Person: Davies
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Description not entered.

Person: Sturm, Weaver
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire performs many beneficial ecosystem functions in dry forests and rangelands across much of North America. In the last century, however, the role of fire has been dramatically altered by numerous anthropogenic factors acting as root causes of the...

Person: DellaSala, Williams, Williams, Franklin
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Can wildland fire behavior really be predicted? That depends on how accurate you expect the prediction to be. The minute-by-minute movement of a fire will probably never be predictable- certainly not from weather conditions forecasted many hours before...

Person: Alexander, Thomas
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

FireWorks is an educational program that provides interactive, hands-on activities for studying fire behavior, fire ecology, and human influences on three fire-dependent forest types-ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), interior lodgepolepine (P. contorta...

Person: Smith, McMurray
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The Tanana River basin in interior Alaska occupies approximately 11.9 million hectares. Forests of the basin consist of white or black spruce (Picea glauca, P. mariana), tamarack (Larix laricina), paper birch (Betula papyrifera), quaking aspen (Populus...

Person: Moser, Moser, Roessler, Packee
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

By almost any measure, the past decade has been severe in terms of wildland fire in the United States. The National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) maintains a list of 'Historically Significant Wildfires' in the U.S. - fires that are...

Person: Jakes, Kruger, Monroe, Nelson, Sturtevant
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES