Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Fire is the primary landscape-scale disturbance in the boreal forest, and in the last half century fires have increased in severity and extent in the boreal forest and tundra. In the past fires at treeline have been rare with low fuel loads and cool/...

Person: Hewitt, Hollingsworth, Taylor, Rupp, Chapin
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This study empirically evaluates and maps the relationships between recruitment and species and tree size diversity, as measured with the Shannon's index, within mixed poplar/birch and mixed spruce stands across the boreal forest of Alaska. Data...

Person: Young, Liang, Chapin
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Recent research has linked climate warming to global declines in caribou and reindeer (both Rangifer tarandus) populations. We hypothesize large-scale climate patterns are a contributing factor explaining why these declines are not universal. To test...

Person: Joly, Klein, Verbyla, Rupp, Chapin
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Given that ecological effects of disturbance have been extensively studied in many ecosystems, it is surprising that few quantitative syntheses across diverse ecosystems have been conducted. Multi-system studies tend to be qualitative because they...

Person: Peters, Lugo, Chapin, Pickett, Duniway, Rocha, Swanson, Laney, Jones
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The structure and function of Alaska's forests have changed significantly in response to a changing climate, including alterations in species composition and climate feedbacks (e.g., carbon, radiation budgets) that have important regional societal...

Person: Wolken, Hollingsworth, Rupp, Chapin, Trainor, Barrett, Sullivan, McGuire, Euskirchen, Hennon, Beever, Conn, Crone, D'Amore, Fresco, Hanley, Kielland, Kruse, Patterson, Schuur, Verbyla, Yarie
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Data from a sparse network of climate stations in Alaska were interpolated to provide 1-km resolution maps of mean monthly temperature and precipitation-variables that are required at high spatial resolution for input into regional models of ecological...

Person: Fleming, Chapin, Cramer, Hufford, Serreze
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

QUESTION: How do pre-fire conditions (community composition and environmental characteristics) and climate-driven disturbance characteristics (fire severity) affect post-fire community composition in black spruce stands? LOCATION: Northern boreal...

Person: Bernhardt, Hollingsworth, Chapin
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Biome differences in surface energy balance strongly affect climate. However, arctic vegetation is considered sufficiently uniform that only a single arctic land surface type is generally used in climate models. Field measurements in northern Alaska...

Person: Chapin, Eugster, McFadden, Lynch, Walker
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Understanding the response of terrestrial ecosystems to climatic warming is a challenge because of the complex interactions of climate, disturbance, and recruitment across the landscape. We use a spatially explicit model (ALFRESCO) to simulate the...

Person: Rupp, Chapin, Starfield
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

An important challenge in global-change research is to stimulate short-term transient changes in climate, disturbance regime, and recruitment that drive long-term vegetation distributions. Spatial features (e.g., topographic barriers) and processes,...

Person: Rupp, Starfield, Chapin
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS