Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 23

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Person: Lyon, Huff, Hooper, Telfer, Schreiner, Smith, Lyon, Brown, Huff, Smith
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text (p.9) ... 'To provide a context for discussion of fire effects on animals and their habitat, this chapter described the vegetation, fire regimes, and postfire succession of several plant communities referred to in subsequent sections...

Person: Lyon, Huff, Hooper, Telfer, Schreiner, Smith, Telfer
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Lyon, Huff, Hooper, Telfer, Schreiner, Smith, Lyon, Telfer, Schreiner
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Lyon, Huff, Hooper, Telfer, Schreiner, Smith, Huff, Smith
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Lyon, Huff, Hooper, Telfer, Schreiner, Smith, Lyon, Smith
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

At the request of public and private wildland fire managers who recognized a need to assimilate current fire effects knowledge, we produced this state-of-the-art integrated series of documents relevant to management of ecosystems. The series covers our...

Person: Brown, Smith, Brown
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

From the text... 'Fire is a key ecological process within most ecosystems in the United States and Canada. An understanding of factors controlling the initial response of vegetation to fire is essential to its management. Fire effects on plants...

Person: Brown, Smith, Miller
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text...'Major forest types include those where aspen, eastern white and red pine stands, and jack pine stands are found either as fire-maintained seral types or exceptionally as climax stands (see table 3-1 for FRES, Kuchler, and SAF...

Person: Brown, Smith, Duchesne, Hawkes
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Temperate grasslands are currently among the most threatened ecosystems in the world. In North America, their widespread use for agriculture and livestock grazing, in addition to the effects of urbanization and other human activities, have led to...

Person: Grace, Smith, Collins, Grace, Stohlgren
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The social impact of wildfire is influenced by how journalists report major conflagrations such as this year*s Cerro Grande fire in New Mexico. Wildfire reporting has improved since the 1988 Yellowstone fires but is still influenced by urban...

Person: Smith
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS