Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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With support from the NASA Applied Sciences Program, the Alaska Fire Science Consortium (AFSC; part of the International Arctic Research Center at UAF) organized an international workshop in April 2017 to advance the application of remote sensing tools...

Person: Jandt, Ziel
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The topic of collaboration across boundaries is fitting for me and for the Forest Service because our national priorities revolve around just that-collaboration across boundaries-especially when it comes to wildland fire. We are committed to improving...

Person: Christiansen
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The wildfire landscape is like a patchwork quilt. Each piece represents a stakeholder: private timber producers; State lands; rural homes and farms; communities; Tribes, pueblos, or reservations; refuges; Federal lands and watersheds; and community...

Person: Leschak
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is the dominant ecological disturbance process in boreal forests (coniferous forests consisting mostly of pines, spruces, and larches) and fire frequency, size and severity are increasing in Alaska owing to climate warming. However, interactions...

Person: Falke, Gray
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The development of frameworks for better-understanding ecological syndromes and putative evolutionary strategies of plant adaptation to fire has recently received a flurry of attention, including a new model hypothesizing that plants have diverged into...

Person: Poulos, Barton, Slingsby, Bowman
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This reference work encompasses the current, accepted state of the art in the science of wildfires and wildfires that spread to communities, known as wildland-urban interface (WUI) fires. More than 300 author contributions include accepted knowledge on...

Person: Manzello
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Purpose of Review: Prevention effectiveness relies on knowledge about the spatio-temporal likelihood of fire occurrence and whether fires are a result of natural processes or human influence. Such knowledge can be used to develop more effective tools...

Person: Hesseln
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This planning framework and the accompanying planning systems audit tool are designed for use by planners working in or with communities located in the wildland-urban interface (WUI). The framework provides a menu of planning tools that communities can...

Person:
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Although wildfires are increasing globally, available information on how mammals respond behaviourally and physiologically to fires is scant. Despite a large number of ecological studies, often examining animal diversity and abundance before and after...

Person: Geiser, Stawski, Doty, Cooper, Nowack
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Large outdoor fires present a risk to the built environment. Examples often in the international media reports are wildfires that spread into communities, referred to as Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) fires. WUI fires have destroyed communities...

Person: Manzello, McAllister, Suzuki
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES