Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Fire in the black spruce ecosystem of northern Canada and Alaska is characterized by large and frequent fires that usually kill the overstorey trees and most, if not all, of the vegetation aboveground. Most species within the black spruce ecosystem...

Person: Wein, MacLean, Viereck
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A general account of the findings of a joint USDA Forest Service/University of Alaska research project studying taiga ecosystems, especially the black spruce type [see FA 42, 5305; 43, 3427]. Black spruce forests are the most nutrient poor and least...

Person: Van Cleve, Dyrness, Viereck, Fox, Chapin, Oechel
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Description not entered.

Person: Van Cleve, Dyrness, Viereck
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Vegetation, forest productivity, and soils of 23 forest stands in the taiga of interior Alaska are described. The stands are arranged on an environmental gradient from an aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) stand on a dry, steep south-facing bluff, to...

Person: Viereck, Dyrness, Van Cleve, Foote
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Changes in the seasonal CO2 flux of the boreal forests may result from increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global warming patterns. To monitor this potential change, a combination of information derived from remote sensing data,...

Person: Way, Rignot, McDonald, Oren, Kwok, Bonan, Dobson, Viereck, Roth
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The structure and function of Alaskan forest ecosystems was examined across two secondary successional sequences. One, the most common in interior Alaska, follows fire in black spruce stands on permafrost sites. The other, less common sequence, follows...

Person: Van Cleve, Viereck
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

An upland tundra fire, started by lightning, burned 48 km2 near the Kokolik River (69¦ 30' N, 151¦ 59' W) in northwestern Alaska during late July and early August 1977. Permanent plots were established to monitor recovery of severely,...

Person: Johnson, Viereck
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire in black spruce ecosystem of northern Canada and Alaska is characterized by large and frequent fires that usually kill the overstory trees and most, if not all, of the vegetation above ground. Most species within the black spruce ecosystem show...

Person: Wein, MacLean, Viereck
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES