Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 214

Fires produce land cover changes that have consequences for surface energy balance and temperature. Three eddy covariance towers were setup along a burn severity gradient (i.e. Severely, Moderately, and Unburned tundra) to determine the effect of fire...

Person: Rocha, Shaver
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal forest carbon (C) storage and sequestration is a critical element for global C management and is largely disturbance driven. The disturbance regime can be natural or anthropogenic with varying intensity and frequency that differ temporally and...

Person: Seedre, Shrestha, Chen, Colombo, Jogiste
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Over the coming decades, climate change will increasingly affect forest ecosystem processes, but the future magnitude and direction of these responses is uncertain. We designed 12 scenarios combining possible changes in tree growth rates, decay rates,...

Person: Metsaranta, Dymond, Kurz, Spittlehouse
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Periodic treatment of established stands of dense nesting cover (DNC) is a recommended practice to maintain cover quality, but little information exists on the magnitude and duration of treatment effects on nesting waterfowl. During 1998-2001, we...

Person: Devries, Armstrong
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forested headwater basins in western North America are subject to major change from natural and anthropogenic disturbance, including wildfire, insect infestation, disease, and forest harvesting. These changes have subsequent impacts on sub-canopy snow...

Person: Burles, Boon
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire frequency is expected to increase due to climate warming in many areas, particularly the boreal forests. An increase in fire frequency may have important effects on the global carbon cycle by decreasing the size of boreal carbon stores. Our...

Person: Brown, Johnstone
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Tundra fires have important ecological impacts on vegetation, wildlife, permafrost, and carbon cycling, but the pattern and controls of historic tundra fire regimes are poorly understood. We use sediment records from four lakes to develop a 2000-yr...

Person: Higuera, Chipman, Barnes, Urban, Hu
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal ecosystems store 10-20% of global soil carbon and may warm by 4-7ºC over the next century. Higher temperatures could increase the activity of boreal decomposers and indirectly affect decomposition through other ecosystem feedbacks. For example,...

Person: Allison, Treseder
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The ratios of observed organic carbon (OC) to elemental carbon (EC) from the rural sites of the IMPROVE network are analyzed for the 5-year period from 2000 to 2004. Among these years, nationwide OC/EC peaks are observed most consistently in the summer...

Person: Zeng, Wang
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Introduction: Environmental contaminants are groups of unwanted, ubiquitous chemicals, found in food via weathering of the earth's crust, combustion (natural or anthropogenic), industrial uses or as unwanted bi-products of manufacturing processes...

Person: Thomson, Rose
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS