Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

More and more people are making their homes in woodland settings in or near forests, rural areas, or remote mountain sites - areas in which wildfires are more likely to occur. Wildfires often begin unnoticed. They spread quickly, igniting brush, trees...

Person:
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

From the text ... 'This special issue compilation of eight papers demonstrates the breadth of remote sensing applications on the cutting edge of fire ecology research. Remotely sensed imagery can provide objective measures of fire perimeters, burn...

Person: Hudak, Thode, van Wagtendonk
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

To improve access, interpretability, and use of the full body of research, a pilot project was initiated by the USDA Forest Service to synthesize relevant scientific information and develop publications and decision support tools that managers can use...

Person: Jakes
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire is a primary change agent in many terrestrial ecosystems. Appreciation is growing for the essential role fire plays in fire-adapted ecosystems. Nevertheless, humans living in the wildland urban interface (WUI) understandably regard fires as a...

Person: Hudak, Thode, van Wagtendonk
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Computational tools have been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for modeling fire spread and smoke transport. These tools have been adapted to address fire scenarios that occur in the wildland urban interface (WUI)...

Person: Butler, Cook, Forney, Mell
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Federal wildland fire policy in the United States has been substantially revised over the past 10 years and new emphasis has been given to the wildland- urban interface (WUI), which creates a need for information about the WUI's location and...

Person: Stewart, Radeloff, Hammer, Hawbaker
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Presenting state-of-science information and discussion of broadly defined air pollution and forest fire issues. Among others, the following topics will be discussed: effects of forest fires on air quality in the remote and urban-wildland interface...

Person: Bytnerowicz
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Forest disturbances caused by insects can lead to other disturbances, risks, and changes across landscapes. Evaluating the human dimensions of such disturbances furthers understanding of integrated changes in natural and social systems. This article...

Person: Flint
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire knows no political boundaries, nor should efforts to address its risk. Collaboration is not a new idea; many examples of natural resource managers and community groups working together can be found in forest management planning, watershed...

Person: Martin, Raish, Kent, Sturtevant, Jakes
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES