Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britt.) can be successfully regenerated by using suitable seedbed preparation techniques, including prescribed fire. Experimental fall burning of tolerant hardwood stands prior to harvesting under a group selection...

Person: Anderson
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Documents the analysis of wind tunnel experiments on fire spread that produced a double ellipse concept of fire area growth. This provides ways of estimating size (area), shape (perimeter), and length to width ratio of a wind-driven wild land fire. The...

Person: Anderson
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The burnout of large-sized woody fuels, 1 to 6 inches thick, is being measured at the USDA Forest Service Northern Forest Fire Laboratory in Missoula, Mont. Physical properties of the fuel bed are varied to determine threshold for interactive burning,...

Person: Robert, Carol, Anderson
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Documents the analysis of wind tunnel experiments on fire spread that produced a double ellipse concept of fire area growth. This provides ways of estimating size (area), shape (perimeter), and length to width ratio of a wind-driven wild land fire. The...

Person: Anderson
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES