Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 41 - 50 of 415

Increased forest density resulting from decades of fire exclusion is often perceived as the leading cause of historically aberrant, severe, contemporary wildfires and insect outbreaks documented in some fire-prone forests of the western United States....

Person: Naficy, Sala, Keeling, Graham, DeLuca
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In forests, termites serve as ''soil engineers,'' translocating mineral soil to the surface, constructing macropores to improve water infiltration, increase soil minerals and organic carbon, facilitate the growth of microbes and...

Person: Peterson
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Aim The spruce-moss forest is the main forest ecosystem of the North American boreal forest. We used stand structure and fire data to examine the long-term development and growth of the spruce-moss ecosystem. We evaluate the stability of the forest...

Person: Pollock, Payette
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire-scarred trees provide a deep temporal record of historical fire activity, but identifying the mechanisms therein that controlled landscape fire patterns is not straightforward. We use a spatially correlated metric for fire co-occurrence between...

Person: Kennedy, McKenzie
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire and logging are common disturbances in the forests of northwestern North America, causing changes in soil chemistry and microbiology, including fungal and nitrogen-cycling bacterial communities. These organisms play key roles in nutrient...

Person: Kennedy, Egger
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The economic costs of adverse health effects associated with exposure to wildfire smoke should be given serious consideration in determining the optimal wildfire management policy. Unfortunately, the literature in this research area is thin. In an...

Person: Kochi, Donovan, Champ, Loomis
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Aim Feedbacks between climate warming and fire have the potential to alter Arctic and sub-Arctic vegetation. In this paper we assess the effects and interactions of temperature and wildfire on plant communities across the transition between the Arctic...

Person: Lantz, Gergel, Henry
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Large-scale natural disturbances are commonplace around the world. They can have profound effects on human infrastructure and populations, as well as substantially influencing key ecological processes, shaping landscapes, and affecting many species....

Person: Lindenmayer, Likens, Franklin
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A serial batch leaching experiment has been carried out to evaluate the release of elements from the ash of Pinus halepensis needles burned under two test conditions-with and without treatment of the forest species with the carbonate minerals (huntite...

Person: Liodakis, Tsoukala
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We update and expand the 1992 survey of research findings by Lowell and colleagues, providing an ecological context for the findings, using a more reader-friendly format, and including extensive citations so readers can get indepth information on...

Person: Lowell, Rapp, Haynes, Cray
Created Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS