Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 228

Large wildfires of increasing frequency and severity threaten local populations and natural resources while contributing carbon emissions into the earth-climate system. Although wildfires have been researched and modeled for decades, no verifiable...

Person: Gollner
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

This paper presents an investigation on the effect of fire intensity of a wind driven surface fire, similar to a large wildfire, on an idealized structure located downstream from the fire source. A numerical simulation was conducted using an open...

Person: Edalati-nejad, Ghodrat, Fanaee, Simeoni
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Marty Alexander (Wild Rose Fire Behavior) and Luc Bibeau (FireSmart Specialist with Yukon Wildland Fire Management, Whitehorse, Yukon Territory) discuss the 3-m tree crown spacing guideline for the prevention of crowning wildfires.

This podcast...

Person: Bibeau, Alexander
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The disruptions to wildland fires, such as firebreaks, roads and rivers, can limit the spread of wildfire propagating through surface or crown fire. A large forest can be separated into different zones by carefully constructing firebreaks through...

Person: Khan, Moinuddin
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The United States has experienced an even longer and more intense wildfire season than normal in recent years, largely resulting from drought conditions and a buildup of flammable vegetation. The derived stochastic dynamic model in this study was...

Person: Al Abri, Grogan
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal about the science, policy, and technology of fires and how they interact with communities and the environment, broadly defined, published quarterly online by MDPI. Fire serves as an...

Person: Xu, Kolomanska, Smith
Year:
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

A new approach to characterize airborne firebrands during Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) fires is detailed. The approach merges the following two imaging techniques in a single field-deployable diagnostic tool: (1) 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry (3D-...

Person: Bouvet, Link, Fink
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Greg Dillon of the USDA Forest Service's Fire Modeling Institute (FMI) gives an overview of the work FMI does in wildland fire.

Webinar hosted by National Weather Service IMET.

Person: Dillon
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is defined as a geographic area where human developments and flammable vegetation merge in a wildfire-prone environment. Losses due to wildfire have been rising in the past decade, attributed to changes in vegetation...

Person: Masoudvaziri, Bardales, Keskin, Sarreshtehdari, Sun, Khorasani
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Over the past few years, numerous large-scale disasters have occurred due to wildfires at the wildland-urban interface (WUI). In these fires, spread via the transport of firebrands (burning embers) plays a significant role. Several models have been...

Person: Hajilou, Hu, Roche, Garg, Gollner
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES