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The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

Displaying 151 - 175 of 14911

Nader, Nakamura, De Lasaux, Quarles, Valachovic
Incorporating fire safe concepts into the residential landscape is one of the most important ways you can help your home survive a wildfire. When conditions are dry and windy, the grasses, brush, trees, or other vegetation surrounding your home become a dangerous fuel source.…
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Quarles, Valachovic, Nakamura, Nader, De Lasaux
Embers are the most important cause of home ignition. Recent research indicates that two out of every three homes destroyed during the 2007 Witch Creek fire in San Diego County were ignited either directly or indirectly by wind-dispersed, wildfire-generated, burning or glowing…
Year: 2010
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Kline, Ager, Fischer
The need for improved methods for managing wildfire risk is becoming apparent as uncharacteristically large wildfires in the western US and elsewhere exceed government capacities for their control and suppression. We propose a coupled biophysical-social framework to managing…
Year: 2015
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Schmoldt
Residential encroachment into wildland areas places an additional burden on fire management activities. Prevention programs, fuel management efforts, and suppression strategies, previously employed in wildland areas, require modification for protection of increased values at…
Year: 1989
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Brenkert-Smith, Meldrum, Champ, Barth
Wildfire and the threat it poses to society represents an example of the complex, dynamic relationship between social and ecological systems. Increasingly, wildfire adaptation is posited as a pathway to shift the approach to fire from a suppression paradigm that seeks to control…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

French, McKenzie, Billmire, Ottmar, Prichard, McCarty, Endsley
The Wildland Fire Emissions Information System (WFEIS) was developed under NASA Carbon Cycle Science and Applications programs to provide a consistent approach to estimating emissions at continental to sub-continental scales (see http://wfeis.mtri.org). We present an overview of…
Year: 2015
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Endsley, McCarty
New media are increasingly used to capture ambient geographic information in multiple contexts, from mapping the evolution of the Tahrir Square protests in Egypt to predicting influenza outbreaks. The social media platform Twitter is popular for these applications; it boasts…
Year: 2015
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Achtemeier, Nikolov
Most of climate change is understood in terms of global-scale warming caused by carbon dioxide released from anthropogenic combustion of fossil fuels. Climate models predict slow but steady warming over the next five to ten decades. Developing fire and smoke management…
Year: 2015
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Thompson, Dunn, Calkin
A changing climate, changing development and land use patterns, and increasing pressures on ecosystem services raise global concerns over growing losses associated with wildland fires. New management paradigms acknowledge that fire is inevitable and often uncontrollable, and…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Smith, Hoover
The carbon reports in the Fire and Fuels Extension (FFE) to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) provide two alternate approaches to carbon estimates for live trees (Rebain 2010). These are (1) the FFE biomass algorithms, which are volume- based biomass equations, and (2) the…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Parsons, Wells, Pimont, Jolly, Cohn, Linn, Mell, Hoffman
With rapid changes in forest health and an increasing presence of fire affecting many landscapes, fuel treatments are considered essential in efforts to potentially mitigate catastrophic fires, restore ecosystems and increase ecosystem resilience. Understanding fuel treatment…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Black, Tesfaigzi, Bassein, Miller
Understanding the effect of wildfire smoke exposure on human health represents a unique interdisciplinary challenge to the scientific community. Population health studies indicate that wildfire smoke is a risk to human health and increases the healthcare burden of smoke-impacted…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Matsypura, Prokopyev, Zahar
Wildfires are a common phenomenon on most continents. They have occurred for an estimated 60 million years and are part of a regular climatic cycle. Nevertheless, wildfires represent a real and continuing problem that can have a major impact on people, wildlife and the…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Oregon Department of Forestry works aggressively to contain and stop wildfires. After a fire ODF helps landowners with reforesting expertise and connecting them with the right people.
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) is the area where human development and the natural world meet or intermingle.
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Duff, Keane, Penman, Tolhurst
Wildland fires are a function of properties of the fuels that sustain them. These fuels are themselves a function of vegetation, and share the complexity and dynamics of natural systems. Worldwide, the requirement for solutions to the threat of fire to human values has resulted…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ebel, Martin
Hydrologic recovery after wildfire is critical for restoring the ecosystem services of protecting of human lives and infrastructure from hazards and delivering water supply of sufficient quality and quantity. Recovery of soil-hydraulic properties, such as field-saturated…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Kelly, Brotons, McCarthy
We reason that applying appropriate levels of pyrodiversity for animal conservation requires recognizing that context is important (i.e., there is no one-size-fits-all approach); understanding the different mechanisms underpinning the overarching pyrodiversity hypothesis;…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Hewitt, Chapin, Hollingsworth, Taylor
Root-associated fungi, particularly ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF), are critical symbionts of all boreal tree species. Although climatically driven increases in wildfire frequency and extent have been hypothesized to increase vegetation transitions from tundra to boreal forest,…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Waigl, Stuefer, Prakash, Ichoku
Fire products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) imagery provide timely information for wildfire detection, monitoring, and characterization at the global scale. However, in Alaskan boreal forest fires…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Yang, Pan, Dangal, Zhang, Wang, Tian
Knowledge and information of post-fire vegetation recovery are essential for our understanding of ecosystem stability and resilience in response to present and future disturbances. Although previous studies have examined the post-fire vegetation recovery at landscape and…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Lake, Wright, Morgan, McFadzen, McWethy, Stevens-Rumann
Indigenous peoples' detailed traditional knowledge about fire, although superficially referenced in various writings, has not for the most part been analyzed in detail or simulated by resource managers, wildlife biologists, and ecologists…. Instead, scientists have developed the…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Freeman, Kobziar, Rose, Cropper
Prescribed fire is widely accepted as a conservation tool because fire is essential to the maintenance of native biodiversity in many terrestrial communities. Approaches to this land-management technique vary greatly among continents, and sharing knowledge internationally can…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Dunn, Thompson, Calkin
The impacts of wildfires have increased in recent decades because of historical forest and fire management, a rapidly changing climate, and an increasingly populated wildland urban interface. This increasingly complex fire environment highlights the importance of developing…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Hewitt, Bent, Hollingsworth, Chapin, Taylor
Climate-induced changes in the tundra fire regime are expected to alter shrub abundance and distribution across the Arctic. However, little is known about how fire may indirectly impact shrub performance by altering mycorrhizal symbionts. We used molecular tools, including ARISA…
Year: 2013
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES