Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 51 - 60 of 141

BlueSky is a real-time smoke forecast system that predicts surface smoke concentrations from prescribed fire, wildfire, and agricultural burn activities. Developed by the USDA Forest Service in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency (...

Person: O'Neill, Ferguson, Peterson, Wilson
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Originally designed as a short-life-span tool to explore the links between surface and crown fire behavior models, NEXUS was first released as an Excel spreadsheet in 1998. The modeling concepts developed for NEXUS have since been used in the Crown...

Person: Scott
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This talk describes development of a physics-based mathematical and computational model to predict fire spread among structures and natural fuels (trees, shrubs and ground litter). This tool will be used to understand how fires spread in a community...

Person: Rehm, Evans, McGrattan, Forney, Bouldin, Baker, Mell, Hostikka
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The extent of extreme fire behavior in the last several fire seasons has highlighted the susceptibility of current forested vegetation stands to crown fire, bringing it to the forefront of national attention. Though much attention has been given...

Person: Fieldhouse, Dickinson
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire has been a natural and essential stand-renewing agent in boreal forests for millennia, and development of the boreal zone for industrial and recreational purposes has required the concurrent development of forest fire management programs that...

Person: Stocks, Kasischke, McRae, Conard, McGuire, Goldammer, Flannigan, Amiro, Sukhinin, Ivanova
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Like similar fires elsewhere, the Cerro Grande Fire burned hotter than historical fires because of fuel buildups from years of fire suppression.'

Person: Greenlee, Greenlee
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Parmenter, Hansen, Kennedy, Cohen, Langner, Lawrence, Maxwell, Gallant, Aspinall
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text...'The worst fire season in Mexican history was in 1998. Drought conditions precipitated by a strong El Niño led to unusual fire activity, including crown fires, fire whirls, and rapid spread rates. A total of 14,302 fires burned 2,...

Person: Rodríguez-Trejo
Year: 1999
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fires are not spatially uniform events. They result in a complicated mosaic of burned and unburned vegetation. To manage fuel loads and the associated fire hazard it is essential to improve our understanding of the spatial patterns of the...

Person: Medler
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The fire season of 2000 is one of the most severe on record, burning approximately seven million acres by the end of September—over 2.5 times the 10-year average of 2.6 million acres. Fires burning in the wildland-urban interface have resulted in...

Person: Hesseln, Rideout
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS