Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

This paper gives an overview of fire in the wildland-urban interface.

Person: Weise, Wotton
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Effective mitigation of external fires on structures can be achieved flexibly, economically, and aesthetically by (1) preventing large-area ignition on structures by avoiding close proximity of burning vegetation; and (2) stopping flame travel from...

Person: Dietenberger
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wildfires that spread into wildland-urban interface (WUI) communities present significant challenges on several fronts. In the United States, the WUI accounts for a significant portion of wildland fire suppression and wildland fuel treatment costs....

Person: Mell, Manzello, Maranghides, Butry, Rehm
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Prescribed burning has, in the past decade, become the focus of debate among policy makers, federal and private land managers, and the public. To manage fire effectively, the USDA Forest Service has formally recognized the need for economic analysis....

Person: Hesseln
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fires are not spatially uniform events. They result in a complicated mosaic of burned and unburned vegetation. To manage fuel loads and the associated fire hazard it is essential to improve our understanding of the spatial patterns of the...

Person: Medler
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The fire season of 2000 is one of the most severe on record, burning approximately seven million acres by the end of September—over 2.5 times the 10-year average of 2.6 million acres. Fires burning in the wildland-urban interface have resulted in...

Person: Hesseln, Rideout
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[From lead-in] Although there are many other fire behavior knowledge gaps and research needs that I could list here (e.g., development of models or guidelines for predicting fire vortex generation, plume-dominated or convectively dominated fires and...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The threat of life and property losses related to wildfires is a significant issue for federal, state, and local fire and planning agencies who consider the mix of residential areas and wildlands. The wildland fire threat is part of the more general...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The wildland-urban interface fire dynamics simulator (WFDS) extends the fire dynamics simulator (FDS), which has been developed for structural fires, to account for the presence of terrain and/or vegetation and the spread of fires through vegetation....

Person: Mell
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In an effort to quantify structure ignition mechanisms during wildland-urban interface (WUI) fires, rapidly deployable instrumentation packages were developed. For a structure under a WUI fire attack, the packages are designed to: (1) provide...

Person: Manzello, Park, Cleary
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES