Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 136

A new approach to characterize airborne firebrands during Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) fires is detailed. The approach merges the following two imaging techniques in a single field-deployable diagnostic tool: (1) 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry (3D-...

Person: Bouvet, Link, Fink
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Greg Dillon of the USDA Forest Service's Fire Modeling Institute (FMI) gives an overview of the work FMI does in wildland fire.

Webinar hosted by National Weather Service IMET.

Person: Dillon
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is defined as a geographic area where human developments and flammable vegetation merge in a wildfire-prone environment. Losses due to wildfire have been rising in the past decade, attributed to changes in vegetation...

Person: Masoudvaziri, Bardales, Keskin, Sarreshtehdari, Sun, Khorasani
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wind plays an important role in the built environment. Large outdoor fires in the built environment are no exception. Under strong wind, firebrands fly far, which leads to quick fire spread. In this study, the effect of structure to structure...

Person: Suzuki, Manzello
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We have devised a rule of thumb for obtaining a first approximation of a fire’s spread rate that wildland fire operations personnel may find valuable in certain situations. It is based on the premise that under certain conditions wind speed is the...

Person: Alexander, Cruz
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The prediction of wildfire rate of spread and growth under high wind speeds and dry fuel moisture conditions is key to taking proactive actions to warn and in turn protect communities. We used two datasets of wildfires spreading under critical fire...

Person: Cruz, Alexander, Fernandes, Kilinc, Sil
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Fire Continuum Conference, co-sponsored by the Association for Fire Ecology and the International Association of Wildland Fire, was designed to cover both the biophysical and human dimensions aspects of fire along the fire continuum. This...

Person: Hood, Drury, Steelman, Steffens
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Pyrolysis is a key process in all stages of wood burning from ignition to extinction. Understanding each stage is crucial to tackle wildfires and assess the fire safety of timber buildings. A model of appropriate complexity of wood pyrolysis and...

Person: Richter, Rein
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

With multiple agencies/entities, groups and task forces all working to find solutions for operational concerns surrounding the coronavirus pandemic, the need for a space to share information is apparent. This forum serves as a platform to ask questions...

Person:
Year:
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire incident management activities create an ideal environment for the transmission of infectious diseases: high-density living and working conditions, lack of access to and use of soap and sanitizers, and a transient workforce. These and...

Person:
Year:
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES