Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Recent wildland fire disasters have attracted interest from a variety of disciplines seeking to reduce impacts of fire on people and natural resources. Architecture, insurance and reinsurance, city and county government, and engineering sectors have...

Person: Finney
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Stand-replacing wildfires are a keystone disturbance in the boreal forest, and they are becoming more common as the climate warms. Paleo-fire archives from the wildland–urban interface can quantify the prehistoric fire regime and assess how both human...

Person: Gaglioti, Mann, Jones, Wooller, Finney
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Over the last two decades wildfire activity, damage, and management cost within the US have increased substantially. These increases have been associated with a number of factors including climate change and fuel accumulation due to a century of active...

Person: Calkin, Thompson, Finney
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Recent fire seasons in the western United States are some of the most damaging and costly on record. Wildfires in the wildland-urban interface on the Colorado Front Range, resulting in thousands of homes burned and civilian fatalities, although...

Person: Calkin, Cohen, Finney, Thompson
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The success of fuel management in helping achieve wildland fire management goals is dependent first upon having realistic expectations. Second, the benefits of fuel management can be realized only when treatments are applied at the appropriate scale to...

Person: Omi, Joyce, Finney, Cohen
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Climate change is to blame for many destructive natural phenomena. But Mark Finney, a research forester with the US Forest Service, says that climate change isn't the cause for a seeming increase of fires around the western United States. Finney...

Person: Finney
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES