Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Fire is an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal about the science, policy, and technology of fires and how they interact with communities and the environment, broadly defined, published quarterly online by MDPI. Fire serves as an...

Person: Xu, Kolomanska, Smith
Year:
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

With multiple agencies/entities, groups and task forces all working to find solutions for operational concerns surrounding the coronavirus pandemic, the need for a space to share information is apparent. This forum serves as a platform to ask questions...

Person:
Year:
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire incident management activities create an ideal environment for the transmission of infectious diseases: high-density living and working conditions, lack of access to and use of soap and sanitizers, and a transient workforce. These and...

Person:
Year:
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

Preliminary list of fire research needs in Alaska.

Person: Barnes
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

What factors may influence new fires burning into or being slowed by previous fire scars? How long can we consider fire scars a fuel barrier? More and more area in Alaska seems to be burning in close succession, or "repeat burns."

Person: Barnes, Ziel
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

A review of weather factors important to predicting tundra fire spread from a study by NOAA Hollings Scholar James White of Ohio State University.

Person: White
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Alaska experiences extremely variable and increasingly active wildland fire seasons, with 6.6 million acres burned in 2004 and 5.1 million in 2015 respectively. The majority of acres burn in relatively brief periods of extremely warm and dry weather....

Person: Fisher, White, Thoman
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires over the last couple decades have increased in size and intensity and the fire season has lengthened, resulting in increased wildfire suppression costs and greater risk to human health and safety. The large, severe fires have also had...

Person:
Year:
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

Presented at the 2013 Spring Fire Management Officer/Agency Administrator Meeting, Alaska Fire Service Training Rooms, Fairbanks

Person: Duffy
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Projections of future fire activity, derived from statistical models, are a powerful tool for anticipating 21st-century fire regimes. In previous work, we developed a set of statistical models that captures fire-climate relationships at 30-yr...

Person: Young
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES