Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Data on fire effects and vegetation recovery are important for assessing the impacts of increasing temperatures and lightning on tundra fire regimes and the implications of increased fire in the Arctic for wildlife and ecosystem processes. This report...

Person: Jandt, Miller, Jones
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The combination of frequent droughts, changing climate conditions, and longer fire seasons along with urban development expansion into wildland areas has resulted in more difficult conditions for managing wildfires. Wildfires are causing more frequent...

Person: Schoennagel, Godwin, Miller
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Distance education, facilitated by modern telecommunications and computer technology, is revolutionizing delivery of college-level courses. In creating an interdisciplinary course on wildland fire, we learned that initial investments of at least $100,...

Person: Walstad, Reed, Doescher, Kauffman, Miller, Shindler, Tappeiner
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

When the federal agencies established policies in the late 1960s and early 1970s to allow the use of natural fires in wilderness, they launched a natural fire management experiment in a handful of wilderness areas. As a result, wildland fire has played...

Person: Miller
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The perception is that today's large fires are an ecological catastrophe because they burn vast areas with high intensities and severities. However, little is known of the ecological impacts of large fires on both historical and contemporary...

Person: Keane, Agee, Fulé, Keeley, Key, Kitchen, Miller, Schulte
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Cross-scale spatial and temporal perspectives are important for studying contagious landscape disturbances such as fire, which are controlled by myriad processes operating at different scales. We examine fire regimes in forests of western North America...

Person: Falk, Miller, McKenzie, Black
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

We report the results of a questionnaire and workshop that sought to gain a better and deeper understanding of the contemporary information needs of wildland fire and fuels managers. Results from the questionnaire indicated that the decision to...

Person: Miller, Landres
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS