Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Data on fire effects and vegetation recovery are important for assessing the impacts of increasing temperatures and lightning on tundra fire regimes and the implications of increased fire in the Arctic for wildlife and ecosystem processes. This report...

Person: Jandt, Miller, Jones
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

As the Arctic warms, tundra wildfires are expected to become more frequent and severe. Assessing how the most flammable regions of the tundra respond to burning can inform us about how the rest of the Arctic may be affected by climate change. Here we...

Person: Gaglioti, Berner, Jones, Orndahl, Williams, Andreu-Hayles, D'Arrigo, Goetz, Mann
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Vegetation fires play an important role in global and regional carbon cycles. Due to climate warming and land‐use shifts, fire patterns are changing and fire impacts increasing in many of the world’s regions. Reducing uncertainties in carbon budgeting...

Person: Santín, Doerr, Jones, Merino, Warneke, Roberts
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

WildfireSAFE was designed to increase firefighter & fire manager situation awareness and enhance risk mitigation planning in wildland fire operations. It supports the greater interagency fire community in the planning, response, and recovery phases...

Person: Jolly, Freeborn, Ramírez, Buckley, Jones
Year:
Resource Group: Tool
Source: FRAMES

The commitment to limit warming to 1.5 °C as set out in the Paris Agreement is widely regarded as ambitious and challenging. It has been proposed that reaching this target may require a number of actions, which could include some form of carbon removal...

Person: Burton, Betts, Jones, Williams
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The regular and consistent measurements provided by Earth observation satellites can support the monitoring and reporting of forest indicators. Although substantial scientific literature espouses the capabilities of satellites in this area, the...

Person: Hislop, Haywood, Jones, Soto-Berelov, Skidmore, Nguyen
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Stand-replacing wildfires are a keystone disturbance in the boreal forest, and they are becoming more common as the climate warms. Paleo-fire archives from the wildland–urban interface can quantify the prehistoric fire regime and assess how both human...

Person: Gaglioti, Mann, Jones, Wooller, Finney
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

After many years of research examining the ignition of wood and other cellulosic fuels, it is still unclear which modes of heat transfer will result in successful ignition of live wildland fuel particles. Thermal radiation can cause a fuel particle to...

Person: Weise, Fletcher, Jolly, Mahalingam, McAllister, Shotorban, Jones, Wong
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Large wildland fires are complex, costly events influenced by a vast array of physical, climatic, and social factors. Changing climate, fuel buildup due to past suppression, and increasing populations in the wildland-urban interface have all been...

Person: Canton-Thompson, Gebert, Thompson, Jones, Calkin, Donovan
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

We stood with the gray-haired ranger on a high ridge in Oregon overlooking a thousand square miles of forest. [from the text] The night before, my GEOGRAPHIC colleague Jay Johnston and I had watched a particularly violent thunderstorm of the type that...

Person: Jones, Johnston
Year: 1968
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES